Politics of Poverty

Filling the gap

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This blog, “The Politics of Poverty,” is meant to help fill the space between the world as we live it, and the measured and idealized realm of research and evidence-based policy.

Dear reader,

However you got here, you are welcome.

Working in the arena of policy, advocacy, and campaigns is dynamic, often frenetic. Politics does not operate on peer-reviewed papers, or copy-edited policy briefings that require weeks – or even months – of development, review and sign off. Life happens at a faster pace, with incomplete information, and a lot of confusion.

This blog, “The Politics of Poverty,” is meant to help fill the space between the world as we live it, and the measured and idealized realm of research and evidence-based policy.

Here we hope to offer news, ideas, and initial reflections around current events, policy debates, and emerging trends that are relevant to the work we do and the mission of Oxfam to promote sustainable solutions to poverty and injustice. Our writers are a mix of advocates, analysts, researchers, and other staff from different parts of Oxfam America’s Policy and Campaigns division.

As an institution, Oxfam America is committed to transparency, engagement, and learning. This blog is meant to be a practitioner’s forum in which we may experiment, even make mistakes, while we continue to maintain the quality standards and reputation of Oxfam America.

This blog is public, of course, but our targeted audience is primarily policy makers, advocates, and academics. So please forgive us if it might seem a bit “insider” at times. Readers may not find every posting interesting. But if you are engaged in the field of policy, advocacy, and campaigns around global poverty, humanitarian response, and justice, we hope you’ll find something here that demands your attention, provokes your intellect, or inspires a reaction.

Since this is a new endeavor, we are especially interested in your reactions to the blog itself – its format, tone, style. Please feel free to offer your opinions and suggestions.

Happy reading – and hopefully, happy writing.

Gawain

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